Check out the June July issue of MOM

Click on the image below to view the June July issue of MOM Magazine featuring Cover MOM, KC Garza, fresh summer blueberry recipes, a cross-country train adventure and more
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The latest issue of MOM is here

Click on the image below to view the April May issue of MOM Magazine featuring Cover MOM, Karla Wilson, kid-tested home design tips and dinner(ish) ideas for those busy spring nights.*

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Check out the Tri Cities February/March issue!

Our February/March issue of MOM Magazine is here featuring Cover MOM Amanda Kuhn, and including inspiration for kids birthday parties, recipes, and ideas for April Fool's Day. Grab a copy today!  (Click on the image below to view the magazine online)

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Play It Safe On Winter Roads

 

 

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Car trouble is never fun, especially if your car if full of kids. So play it safe this winter by following these tips for safe driving in winter conditions.

 

Maintain Your Car: Check the battery, tire tread and windshield wipers. Keep your windows clear, put no-freeze fluid in the washer reservoir and check your antifreeze.

 

Have key items on hand: Keep a flashlight, jumper cables, abrasive material (sand, kitty litter, even floor mats), shovel, snow brush and ice scraper, warning devices (like flares) and

blankets. For long trips, add food and water, medication and cell phone.

 

Stopped or stalled? Stay in your car, put bright markers on antenna or windows and shine dome light. If you run your car, clear exhaust pipe and run it just enough to stay warm.

 

Plan Your route: Allow plenty of time. Check the forecast and adjust your departure to avoid serious weather, if possible. Be familiar with the directions and let others know your route and arrival time.

 

Practice safe snow driving:

  • Practice. During the daylight, rehearse maneuvers slowly on ice or snow in an empty lot.
  • Drive slowly; accelerate, decelerate and turn slowly.
  • Steer into a skid.
  • Know what your brakes will do: stomp on anti lock brakes, pump on non-anti lock brakes.
  • Increase your stopping distances.
  • Don't stop if you can avoid it.
  • Especially don't stop going up a hill. Get some inertia on a flat road before you take on a hill and don't power up a hill. Applying extra gas will start your wheels spinning.
  • Don't idle for a long time with the windows up or in an enclosed space.
  • Stay home. If you really don't have to go out, don't.

Sources: OSHA and AAA

 

Car trouble is never fun, especially if
your car is full of kids. So play it safe
this winter by following these tips for
safe driving in winter conditions.
Maintain your car.
Check the battery, tire tread and
windshield wipers. Keep your windows
clear, put no-freeze fluid in the washer
reservoir and check your antifreeze.
Have key items on hand.
Keep a flashlight, jumper cables, abrasive
material (sand, kitty litter, even floor mats),
shovel, snow brush and ice scraper,
warning devices (like flares) and blankets.
For long trips, add food and water,
medication and cell phone.
Stopped or stalled?
Stay in your car, put bright markers on
antenna or windows and shine dome light.
If you run your car, clear exhaust pipe and
run it just enough to stay warm.
Plan your route.
Allow plenty of time. Check the forecast
and adjust your departure to avoid serious
weather, if possible. Be familiar with the
directions and let others know your route
and arrival time.
Play it safe on winter roads
Brought to you by
Practice safe snow driving:
 Practice. During the daylight, rehearse
maneuvers slowly on ice or snow in an
empty lot.
 Drive slowly; accelerate, decelerate and
turn slowly.
 Steer into a skid.
 Know what your brakes will do: stomp
on anti lock brakes, pump on non-anti
lock brakes.
 Increase your stopping distances.
 Don't stop if you can avoid it.
 Especially don't stop going up a hill.
Get some inertia on a flat road before you
take on a hill and don't power up a hill.
Applying extra gas will start your
wheels spinning.
 Don't idle for a long time with the
windows up or in an enclosed space.
 Stay home. If you really don't have to go
out, don't.
Sources: OSHA and AAA

Congratulations to the 2019 Community Impact Award Recipients


Community Impact Award Seal_19

Thank you to this year's Community Impact Award winners for their work to improve the lives of women and children in our communities.

Look for more information in upcoming issues of MOM Magazine.

 

 

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CANCER CARE FOR OUR CHILDREN

 

LUNCH AND LEARN BEING OFFERED AT TRI-CITIES CANCER CENTER
Kennewick, WA - On Friday, January 18th, 2019, the Tri-Cities Cancer Center will host a lunch and learn session from 12:00 - 1:00pm in their Wellness Center. The topic will be Cancer Care for Our Children and will be led by Dr. Judy Felgenhauer, Pediatric Oncologist at Providence Sacred Heart in Spokane. Dr. Felgenhauer will clarify what care can be done locally and what (and why) cancer care needs to be taken out of town for many childhood cancer diagnoses.
RSVP is encouraged. Lunch provided to those that RSVP. Call (509) 737-3427.
WHAT: Lunch and Learn Session - Cancer Care for Our Children
WHERE: Tri-Cities Cancer Center Wellness Center, 7350 W. Deschutes Ave., Kennewick
WHEN: Friday, January 18, 2019 from 12:00 - 1:00PM
The Tri-Cities Cancer Center is proud to celebrate 25 years of caring for our community by providing world-class cancer treatment, survivorship, prevention and early detection programs delivered with excellence here at home. We are YOUR Tri-Cities Cancer Center. To learn more about the Tri-Cities Cancer Center, please visit www.tccancer.org.

 

 

Because I Said So! Holiday Survival Guide

bad santa

The holidays are not all candy canes and mistletoe; they can be rough on us moms. So here's my guide to (mostly) keeping your sanity during the holidays.

 

Plan. This is equivalent to telling your kids to eat their veggies, or take their vitamins. It's boring advice, but it's the only way to survive the holidays. I always start shopping early. I don't mean Black Friday early, I mean October early. Shopping early leads to more thoughtful gifts, less stress and spending less money.


Hide. While I'm an extroverted, social person, I have serious hermit-tendencies. So the frenetic pace of the holidays and constant needs of my family can take its toll. I just want to pee alone! So before I snap, and sometimes after I snap, I sneak in some alone time. Nothing fancy like a day at the spa, just lingering a little longer than necessary in the shower, or taking a detour through the coffee drive through during one of my countless trips to the store, or ordering my kids to play outside for an hour - I don't care how cold it is!

 

Say "No." I love a good party, and I'm often accused of over-scheduling our family's social calendar. But when I can resist accepting every invitation, the result is some unstructured family time for cookie making, games, holiday movies and more.

 

Forget. "Mommy brain" has its benefits. Most years, I usually forget where I put one or two storage bins of holiday decorations. I think it's my subconscious telling me to take it easy. Skipping a box or two means less time putting up and taking down decorations and when (if) we ever find those decorations next year, they'll seem like new.

 

But the best advice is to ignore the messy house, the dirty dishes and your annoying Uncle Fred and just take a snapshot in your mind of your kids enjoying the holidays this year. They will never be this age again. Savor it.


Why? Because I said so!

 

~ Angela Hibbard, Managing Director & Editor-in-Chief